Transition from Early Intervention Services

Click Here For Transition Calculator


What is transition?

What is the CPSE? 

When should I begin planning for the Transition Passage?

What is the Preschool Special Education Program?

What is Transition Planning?

What is the Transition Conference?

What are the Transition Timelines?

What is the CPSE Evaluation Process?

What should I expect from the CPSE meeting?

What are the differences between an IFSP and an IEP?

What can I do to help in the transition process?

What happens if my child does not qualify for CPSE?

Where can I go for more information or assistance for my child and family?

 

 




What is transition?

At age three (3), children will leave the Early Intervention Program and move on to the next stage. This may mean moving to the Preschool Special Education Program, if eligible.


When should I begin planning for the Transition Passage?

Transition planning begins at the time of your child's first Individualized Family Service Plan (IFSP).  Your IFSP team will begin the discussion about the transition process with you and begin to share information about the Preschool Special Education Program and other community programs.  Throughout the time you and your child receive services in Early Intervention, your ongoing service coordinator (OSC) will confirm what school district you reside in and tell you about the school district's Committee on Preschool Special Education (CPSE)


What is the CPSE?

There is a CPSE in every school district throughout New York State.  Typically, the CPSE is a committee of individuals who decide if a child is eligible for the Preschool Special Education Program and will consist of  you as the parent of the child who is transitioning to the Preschool Special Education Program, a regular education teacher (if the child is or may be participating in the regular education environment), a special education teacher or related service provider, a representative of the local school district who serves as the chairperson of the CPSE, an individual who can interpret Preschool Special Education Program evaluation results, other individuals who have knowledge or special expertise about the child, an additional parent member (If the parent(s) of the child request that this person participates), and possibly a licensed or certified professional from the Department of Health's Early Intervention Program (for a child in transition from the Early Intervention Program) such as the Early Intervention Official Designee (EIOD).


What is the Preschool Special Education Program?

The New York State Education Department (NYSED) administers through each local school district, preschool special education programs and services for preschool students with disabilities who are three to five years of age.  It is also referred to as the 4410 Program because it is part of Section 4410 of the New York State Education Law


What is Transition Planning?

A transition plan is prepared as a child reaches the age of two (2) or if the child is getting ready to be discharged from the Early Intervention Program.  The transition plan, which is part of the Individual Family Service Plan (IFSP), is developed with parents, Early Intervention Official Designee (EIOD), Ongoing Service Coordinator (OSC),and service providers to:

  • Review the progress made by the child and family and considers whether any services are needed when they leave the Early Intervention Program. Any recent evaluations, assessments and progress notes, with the parent's permission, may be sent to the CPSE.
  • Determine if the child should be referred to the local school district's CPSE for an evaluation to qualify for preschool special education program and services. This would include assistance to learn more about  CPSE services (similarities and differences with EI).
  • Determine if the child and family may need services from other special programs under the New York State Health Department such as Child Health Plus, or other services administered by other state or local agencies.  For example, the Office for People with Developmental Disabilities, Office of Mental Health, or the Office of Children and Family Services.
  • Review the required timelines and deadlines for timely transition and incorporate the transition plan into the IFSP. 
  • Develop a transition plan for the child and family that include steps to support them in transitioning, specific action steps to make it happen, person(s) who will help with this plan, and dates that will start and complete each step.
  • Identify community resources and services, supports etc. needed by and available for the child and family.

What is the Transition Conference?

The purpose of the Transition Conference is to decide whether or not your child should be referred to the Preschool Special Education Program, review program options available to your child, and develop the transition plan.  When your child reaches two (2) years of age, your child's service coordinator will convene a Transition Conference with your permission. This conference must happen at least 90 days before your child's eligibility for CPSE, and no fewer than 90 days before your child's third birthday, whichever comes first.   However, such conference shall not be held more than nine months prior to the child's third birthday, to review program options and if appropriate, establish a transition plan.   A transition conference can happen in many ways. For example, it can be a telephone conference call, or it can be combined with an IFSP meeting.  The transition conference must be at a time and place good for you and the other participants. It is an important discussion with your child's service coordinator.  They will:

    1. Review the overall transition process including important timelines.
    2. Obtain all parental consents/declination for notification to the CPSE.
    3. Plan steps to refer to the respective CPSE office and/or other supports and services.
    4. Plan steps to help your child to adjust to new settings.

What are the Transition Timelines?

Depending on your child's birthday, there are certain dates that your child may be first eligible for the Preschool Special Education Program.  Your Early Intervention Official Designee (EIOD) must give a certain amount of notice prior to the date that your child may be eligible for the Preschool Special Education Program. However, if your child is not found eligible by the CPSE,  your child MUST be out of the Early Intervention Program by the time they are three years old.  Please refer to the chart below or go to the transition calculator located at http://www.p12.nysed.gov/specialed/preschool/transitioncalculator.htm for more information. 

 

 Child's Birthday

Initial Date Child is potentially eligible for CPSE

Last date for child to receive EI services if found eligible for CPSE services

January to June

January 2nd

August 31st

July to August

July  1st

August 31st

September to December

July 1st

January 1st

 


 


What is the CPSE Evaluation Process?

Written notification will be provided to the local CPSE when the child is potentially eligibility for services, unless the parent opts-out of this notification.  Written notification will occur at least 90 days before your child is first eligible for preschool special education services.  A parent has 30 calendar days from the date the notification process is explained to opt out.  Parents can opt out at any time within the 30 days. If parent does not respond within the 30 days, written notification will be sent to the CPSE.  Notification will be sent to your local school district's CPSE, and you will receive a packet of information that includes a written consent to have your child evaluated by an approved Preschool Special Education Program evaluator, a list of approved Preschool Special Education Program evaluation agencies, and a copy of procedural safeguards.  Some school districts will ask you to come in and meet with a CPSE representative to discuss the process. They may also ask you to bring proof of county residency (such as a utility bill) and register with the school district. The sooner you complete this initial process, the sooner the school district can schedule your child for a CPSE evaluation. Recent IFSPs, evaluations and progress notes from EI will also be sent to the CPSE with your permission. 

The CPSE evaluation is not that different from Early Intervention. This will include information gathering and a series of individually administered assessments and behavioral observations.  A social history including a health history, physical examination, psychological evaluation, and an observation of your child in their natural setting (such as at home or in the day care center) will occur within 60 calendar days from the day the CPSE received your written consent.  A copy of the evaluation report will be given to you and other CPSE members prior to your CPSE meeting.


What should I expect from the CPSE meeting?

The CPSE chairperson will schedule a meeting with you and ensure that the necessary CPSE members will be at your meeting.  These meetings are mostly held at the school district's CPSE offices. Results of your child's evaluation will be reviewed and you have the opportunity to share more information about your child such as their developmental, health and family history and your child's strengths, needs, likes, dislikes and everyday typical behavior relating to language and communication, motor skills, social skills with other children and adults, etc.

If your child is found eligible for CPSE services, an Individualized Education Program (IEP) will be developed and will include recommended services to be provided, how often and how long.  These recommendations must be approved by your local school district board of education (but note that your child's name will not be shared with school board members).

Once approved, services on your child's IEP may include, but not limited to, one or more of the following special education programs and/or services:

  • Related Services (e.g. Speech Therapy, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Assistive technology, Parent education, Counseling).
  • Special Education Itinerant Teacher (SEIT) - a special education teacher works with a child in a setting recommended by the CPSE.
  •  Special Class in an Integrated Setting (SC/IS) - a class with preschool students with and without disabilities.
  • Special Class (SC) - a class with only children with disabilities.

What are the differences between an IFSP and an IEP?

 

IFSP

IEP

Provides family centered services to meet the developmental needs of eligible children

Provides special education and related services to meet the educational needs of identified preschool and school age students with disabilities

 

Birth through age 3

Ages 3 to 21 years

 

Inclusive of the child and family's needs

Focuses on the child's needs

 

Services provided in natural environments where children under three years are typically found such as the child's home, day care or family day care settings.

 

Services provided in a least restrictive environment where age appropriate peers without disabilities are typically found in a setting as close as possible to the student's home.

 

Service coordination

No service coordination but a service provider is designated to coordinate the provision of services.

 

IFSP is developed jointly by the IFSP team which includes the parent, Early Intervention Official Designee, service coordinator, evaluation representative, and other participants invited by the parent. 

IEP is developed by the CPSE members which include the parent, regular education teacher, special education teacher, parent member, CPSE chairperson, and evaluation representative.


What can I do to help in the transition process?

 

 Here are some tips on how you can help your child and your family make a smooth transition from Early Intervention to the Preschool Special Education Program:

 

  •   Ask your transition team to help put together a Transition Plan Family Outcomes worksheet that will include transition services, specific actions to be taken, persons to help facilitate these action steps, dates to   be implemented and when it was completed, and results/conclusions
  •    Ask about possible program options or choices of programs.
  •    Keep a file on your child that includes your child's health history, medical reports, evaluations/assessments, and past IFSPs. 
  •    Visit the program with your child before they start. If possible, meet with your child's new teacher.
  •    Attend parent orientation to learn about what the program offers and meet other parents.  
  •    Advocate for your child and be a collaborative partner with your CPSE team
  •    Keep informed about your child's adjustment and progress. Make sure this information is noted in your child's IEP.

What happens if my child does not qualify for CPSE?

If your child does not qualify, your ongoing service coordinator (OSC) will assist you in finding other community programs such as local day care centers, mommy and me/daddy and me programs, local library programs, etc. Your child must exit EI prior to their third (3rd) birthday.


Where can I go for more information or assistance for my child and family?

For more information about transition, please refer to the guidance memoranda that the  New York State Department of Health and New York State Education Department has issued.

The Early Childhood Direction Centers (ECDC) provide information about programs and services for young children from birth through five years of age who have physical, mental or emotional disabilities and help families obtain services for their children.  They are located throughout the state.

For information about child care, please see the Child Care Resource and Referral Centers which are located throughout New York State.

Center for Parent Information and Resources    http://www.parentcenterhub.org/

For more information visit NYS Department of Health Bureau of Early Intervention at  https://regs.health.ny.gov/content/section-69-420-transition-planning